Why is food such a big part of italian culture?

First of all, meals should be enjoyed (which is convenient considering how good the food is). Food is one of the defining characteristics of Italian culture and is taken very seriously.

Why is food such a big part of italian culture?

First of all, meals should be enjoyed (which is convenient considering how good the food is). Food is one of the defining characteristics of Italian culture and is taken very seriously. Many Italian dishes are simple and consist of just a few ingredients. They often don't serve butter or olive oil with bread and don't consume too much herbs in their pasta sauces.

They believe that these add-ins take away the true flavor of food and are used in American dishes only to mask bad food. Therefore, it is important for Italians that during meals they take the time necessary to understand what is in front of them, to try the different flavors and to appreciate the food. The Renaissance greatly influenced Italian cuisine, with greater communication between neighboring countries in Europe. With dense urban centers as the seat of trade and commerce, the role of cuisine changed in Italy, moving away from isolated agricultural traditions.

Now, food has become a source of enjoyment and cultural exchange. During this time, many different spices and ingredients passed through the ports of Italy, and the kitchens of the rich were staffed by professional kitchen staff. A typical Italian dish will include ingredients such as olive oil, pasta, cheese, cured meat, beans, sauces, pesto, Italian tomatoes, bruschetta and japenades, etc. Italians are masters at preserving their heritage, and this has not gone unnoticed due to their love for traditional food, as Italians' daily lives are full of an incredible collection of delicious and highly nutritious foods that have been part of the family tradition for many years.

In the United States, for example, you'll find the influence of Italian cuisine in places like Philadelphia with the cheesesteak and New Orleans with the muffuletta. Until the reunification of Italy in 1860, the many groups that moved left an indelible mark not only on Italian life, but also on Italian cuisine.

Michelle Lento
Michelle Lento

Devoted tv geek. Proud travelaholic. Friendly bacon junkie. Wannabe coffee scholar. Proud pop culture expert.